A Publication of St. Thomas University Journalism

Category archive

Tides of Change

IMPOSSIBLE DREAMS AND HOW TO ACHIEVE THEM

BY KENYA MARCELLINE The aroma of Caribbean flavours escaped from Naz’s dorm into the hallways of his residence at the University of New Brunswick. These lingering smells left many with the desire to taste the dishes that the Trinidad and Tobago native prepared in his room. “People on the wing would say, man this smells good,… … Keep Reading

THE SAMOSA FAMILY

BY MARIA J. BURGOS The sun’s not up when Karim Fagir’s alarm goes off. After dressing, he walks to the small house next door. This house is the Fagir family’s kitchen. He opens one of the many fridges and loads boxes containing thousands of samosas onto his truck. His watch says 6 a.m. when he… … Keep Reading

MARKET FOR CHANGING CITY

DASH OF SPICE BY EMILY MCPHEE Elma Miranda-Mirza moved to New Brunswick from Ontario in 2009. She hails originally from India, but spent most of her life in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Miranda-Mirza had known her now-husband, Hasnain Mirza, since they were kids. He’s originally from Pakistan, but spent 17 years in Dubai as well.… … Keep Reading

THE UNIVERSAL LANGUAGE OF SOCCER

BY JOHNNY CULLEN You’ll find them at the Wesleyan Church on Duncan Lane. They roll around on the floor, getting covered in that gym-floor dust basketball players are always wiping off the soles of their sneakers at a stoppage in play. They spring into the air like the stuntmen that got launched out of  cannons… … Keep Reading

MEMORIES OF WAR HAUNT THOSE WHO ESCAPE

BY OSCAR BAKER III When Nelofer Pazira landed in Moncton, New Brunswick, she was 17. She came with her brother and sister and parents from Kabul, Afghanistan, escaping war and the Russian invasion of her homeland. “We arrived, and I say this quite proudly, we arrived with the basics and we had $50 to our… … Keep Reading

LUTZ’S LIFELINE: WHAT NEWCOMERS CAN DO

BY JOSEPH TUNNEY On a rainy late winter afternoon in a church on the outskirts of Saint John, N.B., a family seeking refuge from the civil war in Syria broke bread with new friends in a strange land. Two weeks earlier, the Saeed family flew from Turkey to New Brunswick to become permanent residents of… … Keep Reading

TIDES OF CHANGE

Tides of Change: New Beginnings in New Brunswick, is a project of the graduating journalism class at St. Thomas University in Fredericton, N.B. The project began with an idea that we called “newcomers.” We knew that New Brunswick’s population is growing older, and depending on the year, is either stagnate or in decline. The implications… … Keep Reading

FOR THE ONE WHO KNOCKS

BY CONOR BROWN On a Sunday last November at the Cherryfield Baptist Church near Moncton, N.B., Steve Dempster preached a sermon on the subject of Jesus’s Sermon on the Mount. He related the text to the Syrian refugee crisis. For the one who knocks, the door will be opened. Do unto others as you would… … Keep Reading

‘LUGGAGE YOU CANNOT SEE’

BY ALEXANDER CORBETT Frederick Wangabo Mwenengabo was 34 when he was granted asylum to move to Fredericton, New Brunswick. He felt great relief, but still carried a great burden. “When you see a refugee come, there is something plus to luggage they bring,” he says. “There is luggage you cannot see.” Today Mwenengabo is the… … Keep Reading

OLD MEMORIES, NEW FRIENDS

BY JOHNNY CULLEN It takes them nearly an hour. Not to move the mattress in, that’s the easy part. But simple human interaction, verbal communication; now that part is tricky. English and Arabic? It might as well have been Klingon and Elvish; these guys aren’t on the same page. One thing the Syrian boy and… … Keep Reading

MY LONG LEAP OF FAITH

BY HADEEL IBRAHIM When I was nine years old, I found a gun in my mother’s bedside table. She took the gun with her when she did rounds around our home three times a night, every night. As young as I was, this did not surprise me. I had the unfair advantage of being completely accustomed… … Keep Reading

THE LANGUAGE OF FRIENDSHIP

BY DEBORAH NOBES I have a new family. They happen to be from Syria. They landed in New Brunswick four weeks ago, on a dark midnight in the dead of winter, greeted by me and my friend Marie, a driver sent by the local multicultural association, and an Arabic/English interpreter. The Fredericton airport was mostly… … Keep Reading

THE NEW CULTURE OF FOOD

BY KATE OULTON Yusuf Shire Mohamed, the produce manager at the Victory Meat Market in downtown Fredericton, N.B., landed his job almost by accident. He was 18 years old, and had recently immigrated to Canada from Somalia through a refugee camp in Kenya with his younger brother. When Mohamad came to Fredericton he needed to… … Keep Reading

SOUNDING THE ALARM

BY TAYLOR HOYT He calls it New Brunswick’s “demographic deficit.” Or the “demographic perfect storm.” Or the “triple demographic whammy.” For years, Constantine Passaris, a professor of economics at the University of New Brunswick, has been sounding the alarm. “In its most rudimentary form the demographic deficit is about people,” Passaris writes in the Journal of… … Keep Reading

Andreina Charris.

NO EASY ROAD

By SARA PEREZ When Arianne Melara graduated from St. Thomas University with the top accumulated GPA in economics courses in 4th year, an award for best political science thesis and four years of community involvement she was sure she’d be able to find a job in New Brunswick. “I was networking a lot throughout my years… … Keep Reading

RAHMEH PAYS IT FORWARD

BY JOSEPH TUNNEY She moves her hands with each sentence she speaks. She has short brown hair with piercing hazel eyes. In her living room hang a few photos of her past life. The rest are gone, left behind in Syria, in a home long looted. She offers coffee, muffins, whatever she has to open her home… … Keep Reading

IMMIGRATION CREATES JOBS

BY JORDAN GILL The province’s chief economist David Campbell says bringing more immigrant families to New Brunswick will essentially pay for itself. “They will fill labour market needs. So if you need workers they can fill that need. But then they also create the need for products and services themselves,” said Campbell. “A thousand immigrant families, earning… … Keep Reading

BY THE NUMBERS

BY CONNOR JAY New Brunswick population in 2011: 755,500. New Brunswick population today: 753,914. In 2014, New Brunswick had more deaths than births. Number of births in New Brunswick from January to September, 2015: 5,040. Number of deaths in New Brunswick from January to September, 2015: 5,381. Population growth in New Brunswick from January to… … Keep Reading

THE TRUTH OF HIJAB

BY EMMA CHAPPLE It’s still rare to see women wearing hijab on the streets of Fredericton. But the sight will become more common as the number of Syrian refugees here grows. Many of the Muslim women among the more than 300 refugees already here choose to wear hijab. Social Innovation Fredericton is trying to demystify… … Keep Reading

‘I CAN OVERCOME ANYTHING’

By OSCAR BAKER III Shahrom Ghanbori immigrated to Fredericton in mid-winter last year. The Iranian man and his family faced the January weather and embraced the challenges of making a new home in a new country. “I don’t believe anything difficult exists at all in the world,” said the 54-year-old-father of two. “I can overcome… … Keep Reading

THINGS THAT MAKE A HOME

BY EMILY McPHEE A nondescript pop-up warehouse in an industrial park on the outskirts of Fredericton has become a place of new beginnings. It’s a place where families from Syria who left everything behind when they fled from a terrible war can find things they need to start making homes in a new land. Most… … Keep Reading

ESSENTIAL LANGUAGE APPS

BY CONNOR JAY With the wave of Syrian families arriving in New Brunswick, technology is helping many residents of Fredericton overcome language barriers. Here’s a list of smartphones apps that can help you out. Google Translate is the most popular translation app and arguably the best. Google Translate is easy to use and navigate. Its… … Keep Reading

IN THE FOOTSTEPS OF EVANGELINE

Acclaimed journalist Lyse Doucet was once told by the head of UNHCR (United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees) that she saw Acadians as the modern world’s first refugees. That statement stuck with Ms. Doucet.  Not only is she the BBC’s chief international correspondent, but she is also of Acadian descent. In the 2015 Dalton Camp Lecture at… … Keep Reading

Go to Top